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dutourdumonde-photography:

Lamborghini Miura at Goodwood Festival of Speed 2014.

dutourdumonde-photography:

Lamborghini Miura at Goodwood Festival of Speed 2014.

(via hal23)

— 1 hour ago with 10 notes

Help joINT Literary launch and sustain a writing workshop series for queer, trans, and gender-non-conforming youth in Georgetown, SC and Washington, DC. This fundraiser not only is for a necessary cause, but also boasts of fabulous prizes from Black Girl Dangerous creator Mia McKenzie, slam poet J Mase III, poet Kai Davis, and more! Donate here.
Twitter | Facebook

Help joINT Literary launch and sustain a writing workshop series for queer, trans, and gender-non-conforming youth in Georgetown, SC and Washington, DC. This fundraiser not only is for a necessary cause, but also boasts of fabulous prizes from Black Girl Dangerous creator Mia McKenzie, slam poet J Mase III, poet Kai Davis, and more! Donate here.

Twitter | Facebook

(Source: bklynboihood, via afrometaphysics)

— 14 hours ago with 19 notes
thinksquad:

“Is now the time to buy water?” enquired the email that showed up in my inbox earlier this week.
Its authors weren’t worrying about my dehydration levels. Rather, they were urging me to think of water in quite a new way: as a commodity to invest in.
Making money from water? Is this what Wall Street wants next?
After spending nearly 30 years of my life writing about business and finance, including several years dedicated to the commodities market, the idea of treating water as a pure commodity – something to bought and sold on the open market by those in quest of a profit rather than trying to deliver it to their fellow citizens as a public service – made me pause.
Sure, I’ve grown up surrounded by bottled mineral water – Evian, Volvic, Perrier, Pellegrino and even more chi-chi brands – but that has always existed alongside a robust municipal water system that delivers clean water to whatever home I’m occupying. All it takes is turning a tap. The cost of that water is fractions of a penny compared to designer bottled water.
This summer, however, myriad business forces are combining to remind us that fresh water isn’t necessarily or automatically a free resource. It could all too easily end up becoming just another economic commodity.
http://www.theguardian.com/money/2014/jul/27/water-nestle-drink-charge-privatize-companies-stocks

thinksquad:

“Is now the time to buy water?” enquired the email that showed up in my inbox earlier this week.

Its authors weren’t worrying about my dehydration levels. Rather, they were urging me to think of water in quite a new way: as a commodity to invest in.

Making money from water? Is this what Wall Street wants next?

After spending nearly 30 years of my life writing about business and finance, including several years dedicated to the commodities market, the idea of treating water as a pure commodity – something to bought and sold on the open market by those in quest of a profit rather than trying to deliver it to their fellow citizens as a public service – made me pause.

Sure, I’ve grown up surrounded by bottled mineral water – Evian, Volvic, Perrier, Pellegrino and even more chi-chi brands – but that has always existed alongside a robust municipal water system that delivers clean water to whatever home I’m occupying. All it takes is turning a tap. The cost of that water is fractions of a penny compared to designer bottled water.

This summer, however, myriad business forces are combining to remind us that fresh water isn’t necessarily or automatically a free resource. It could all too easily end up becoming just another economic commodity.

http://www.theguardian.com/money/2014/jul/27/water-nestle-drink-charge-privatize-companies-stocks

(via hard-wired-info)

— 20 hours ago with 403 notes
#water  #resources  #oil 

floradventure:

booriful:

alalae:

ttnpt:

Street views of Europe pt 1
Paris, Annecy, Lyon, Rome, Verona, Venice, Burano, Vienna, Budapest

amazing

Wow

real tears

(via honeyttea)

— 21 hours ago with 13206 notes
probablyasocialecologist:

How Japan Plans to Build an Orbital Solar Farm
Here Comes the Sun: Mirrors in orbit would reflect sunlight onto huge solar panels, and the resulting power would be beamed down to Earth. Image: John MacNeill

Imagine looking out over Tokyo Bay from high above and seeing a man-made island in the harbor, 3 kilometers long. A massive net is stretched over the island and studded with 5 billion tiny rectifying antennas, which convert microwave energy into DC electricity. Also on the island is a substation that sends that electricity coursing through a submarine cable to Tokyo, to help keep the factories of the Keihin industrial zone humming and the neon lights of Shibuya shining bright.
But you can’t even see the most interesting part. Several giant solar collectors in geosynchronous orbit are beaming microwaves down to the island from 36 000 km above Earth.
It’s been the subject of many previous studies and the stuff of sci-fi for decades, but space-based solar power could at last become a reality—and within 25 years, according to a proposal from researchers at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The agency, which leads the world in research on space-based solar power systems, now has a technology road map that suggests a series of ground and orbital demonstrations leading to the development in the 2030s of a 1-gigawatt commercial system—about the same output as a typical nuclear power plant.

Continue reading 
Further reading:
The US Navy’s Plan to Beam Down Energy From Orbiting Solar Panels
Space-based solar power
Space-based solar power (wikipedia)
Solar Power via the Moon (pdf)
Solar Power Satellite Design Considerations
URSI White Paper on Solar Power Satellite (SPS) Systems (pdf)
Orbiting Solar Panels Beam Energy From Space

probablyasocialecologist:

How Japan Plans to Build an Orbital Solar Farm

Here Comes the Sun: Mirrors in orbit would reflect sunlight onto huge solar panels, and the resulting power would be beamed down to Earth. Image: John MacNeill

Imagine looking out over Tokyo Bay from high above and seeing a man-made island in the harbor, 3 kilometers long. A massive net is stretched over the island and studded with 5 billion tiny rectifying antennas, which convert microwave energy into DC electricity. Also on the island is a substation that sends that electricity coursing through a submarine cable to Tokyo, to help keep the factories of the Keihin industrial zone humming and the neon lights of Shibuya shining bright.

But you can’t even see the most interesting part. Several giant solar collectors in geosynchronous orbit are beaming microwaves down to the island from 36 000 km above Earth.

It’s been the subject of many previous studies and the stuff of sci-fi for decades, but space-based solar power could at last become a reality—and within 25 years, according to a proposal from researchers at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The agency, which leads the world in research on space-based solar power systems, now has a technology road map that suggests a series of ground and orbital demonstrations leading to the development in the 2030s of a 1-gigawatt commercial system—about the same output as a typical nuclear power plant.

Continue reading 

Further reading:

(via hard-wired-info)

— 1 day ago with 896 notes
"So, what’s the trade-off here? In general, we are safer (automation makes airline flying safer, in general) except in the long-tail: pilots are losing both tacit knowledge of flying and some of its mechanics. But in general, we, as humans, have less and less understanding of our machines—we are compartmentalized, looking at a tiny corner of a very complex system beyond our individual comprehension. Increasing numbers of our systems—from finance to electricity to cybersecurity to medical systems, are going in this direction. We are losing control and understanding which seems fine—until it’s not. We will certainly, and unfortunately, find out what this really means because sooner or later, one of these systems will fail in a way we don’t understand."
— 1 day ago with 174 notes